A witch-hunt for trojans in our chips

A Hardware Trojan (HT) is a malicious modification of the circuitry of an integrated circuit.

 

A malicious chip can make a device malfunction in several ways. It has been rumored that a hardware trojan implanted in a Syrian air-defense radar caused it to stop operating during an airstrike, thus instantly minimizing the country’s situational awareness and threat response capabilities. In other settings, hardware trojans may leak encryption keys or other secrets, or even generate weak keys that can be easily recovered by the adversary.

This article introduces a new trojan-resilient architecture, discusses its motivation and outlines how it differs from existing solutions. The full paper (Vasilios MavroudisAndrea CerulliPetr Svenda, Dan CvrcekDusan Klinec, George Danezis) has been presented in several academic and industrial venues including DEF CON 25, and ACM Conference on Computer and Communications Security 2017.

The Challenge of Detecting HT

Judging from the abundance of governmental, industrial and academic projects concerned with the prevention and the detection of hardware trojans, there is a consensus regarding the severity of the threat and it’s not taken lightly. DARPA has launched the “Integrity and Reliability of Integrated Circuits“ program aiming to develop techniques for the detection of malicious circuitry. The Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity funded a project aiming to redesign the fabrication of integrated circuits, while various other initiatives are currently undergoing (e.g., the COST Action project on “Trustworthy Manufacturing and Utilization of Secure Devices” and the DoD Trusted Foundry program). In addition to these, there are numerous other industrial and academic projects proposing new trojan detection techniques every year, only to be circumvented by follow up work.

But do Hardware Trojans exist?

Ironically, until now there have been no cases where malicious circuitry was detected in military-grade or even commercial chips. With nothing more than rumors to hint about hardware trojans (in places other than academic lab benches), one cannot but question their existence. In other words, is HT design and insertion too complex to be practical, or do our detection tools fail to detect the malicious circuitry embedded in the chips around us?

It could be that both are true: hardware trojans do not exist (yet) as malicious actors are focusing on other aspects of the hardware that are easier to compromise. In all cases where trojans were discovered, the erroneous behavior was traced to the chip’s firmware and not its circuitry. Interestingly, in the vast majority of those incidents the security flaws were attributed to honest fabrication mistakes (e.g., manufacturer failing to disable a testing interface).

Intentional vs. Unintentional Errors

It is safe to always assume that an IC will fail in the worst possible way, at the worst possible time (see Syrian airdefense incident). This “crash n’ burn” approach is common in critical systems (e.g., airplanes, satellites, dams), where any divergence from normal operation will result in an irrecoverable failure of the whole system.

To mitigate the risk, critical system designers employ redundancy techniques to eliminate single points of failure and thus make their setups resilient to faults. A common example are triple-redundant systems used in autopilots. Those systems employ three identical chips sourced from disjoint supply chains and replicate all the navigation computations across them. This allows the system to both tolerate a misbehaving chip and detect its presence.

It is noteworthy, that those systems do not consider the cause of the chip malfunction, and simply assume that they fail in the worst possible way. Following from this, a malicious chip is not significantly different from a defective one. After all, any adversary sophisticated enough to design and insert a hardware trojan is capable of making it indistinguishable from honest manufacturing errors. Similarly, from an operational perspective it makes little sense to distinguish between trojans in the circuitry and trojans in the firmware as the risk they pose for the system is identical.

Distributing Trust for Resilience

Given that it is impossible to achieve 100% detection rates of hardware trojans and errors, it is important that our devices maintain their security properties even in their presence. Our work introduces a new high-level device architecture that is resilient to both. In its core, it uses a redundancy-based architecture and secret-sharing protocols to distribute all secrets and computations among multiple chips. Hence, unless all chips are compromised by the same adversary, the security of the system remains intact. A key point is that those chips should originate from disjoint supply chains. This is to minimize the risk of the same adversary compromising more than one chips. To evaluate its practicality in real-life applications, we built a Hardware Security Module (HSM) that performs standard cryptographic operations (e.g., key generation, decryption, signing) at a very high rate. HSMs are commonly used in operations where security is critical, and an increased transaction throughput is needed (e.g., banking, certification Authorities). A demonstration is shown in the video above, and further details are on our website. Finally, our work can be easily combined with all existing detection and prevention techniques to further decrease the likelihood of compromises.

On the security and privacy of the ultrasound tracking ecosystem

In April 2016, the US Federal Trade Commission (FTC) sent warning letters to 12 Google Play app developers. The letters were addressed to those who incorporated the SilverPush framework in their apps, and reminded developers who used tracking software to explicitly inform their users (as seen in Section 5 of the Federal Trade Commission Act). The incident was covered by popular press and privacy concerns were raised. Shortly after, SilverPush claimed no active partnerships in the US and the buzz subsided.

Unfortunately, as the incident was resolved relatively fast, very few technical details of the technology were made public. To fill in this gap and understand the potential security implications, we conducted an in-depth study of the SilverPush framework and all the associated technologies.

The development of the framework was motivated by a fast-increasing interest of the marketing industry in products performing high-accuracy user tracking, and their derivative monetization schemes. This resulted in a high demand for cross-device tracking techniques with increased accuracy and reduced prerequisites.

The SilverPush framework fulfilled both of these requirements, as it provided a novel way to track users between their devices (e.g., TV, smartphone), without any user actions (e.g., login to a single platform from all their devices). To achieve that, the framework realized a previously unseen cross-device tracking technique (i.e., ultrasound cross-device tracking, uXDT) that offered high tracking accuracy, and came with various desirable features (e.g., easy to deploy, imperceptible by users). What differentiated that framework from existing ones was the use of high-frequency, inaudible ultrasonic beacons (uBeacons) as a medium/channel for identifier transmission between the user’s devices. This is also offered a major advantage to uXDT, against other competing technologies, as uBeacons can be emitted by most commercial speakers and captured by most commercial microphones. This eliminates the need for specialized emission and/or capturing equipment.

Aspects of a little-known ecosystem

The low deployment cost of the technology fueled the growth of a whole ecosystem of frameworks and applications that use uBeacons for various purposes, such as proximity marketing, audience analytics, and device pairing. The ecosystem is built around the near-ultrasonic transmission channel, and enables marketers to profile users.

Unfortunately, users are often given limited information on the ecosystem’s inner workings. This lack of transparency has been the target of great criticism from the users, the security community and the regulators. Moreover, our security analysis revealed a false assumption in the uBeacon threat model that can be exploited by state-level adversaries to launch complex attacks, including one that de-anonymizes the users of anonymity networks (e.g., Tor).

On top of these, a more fundamental shortcoming of the ecosystem is the violation of the least privilege principle, as a consequence of the access to the device’s microphone. More specifically, any app that wants to employ ultrasound-based mechanisms needs to gain full access to the device’s microphone, as there is currently no way to gain access only to the ultrasound spectrum. This clearly violates the least privilege principle, as the app has now access to all audible frequencies and allows a potentially malicious developer to request access to the microphone for ultrasound-pairing purposes, and then use it to eavesdrop the user’s discussions. This also results in any ultrasound-enabled apps to risk being perceived as “potentially malicious” by the users.

Mitigation

To address these shortcomings, we developed a set of countermeasures aiming to provide protection to the users in the short and medium term. The first one is an extension for the Google Chrome browser, which filters out all ultrasounds from the audio output of the websites loaded by the user. The extension actively prevents web pages from emitting inaudible sounds, and thus completely thwarts any unsolicited ultrasound-tracking attempts. Furthermore, we developed a patch for the Android permission system that allows finer-grained control over the audio channel, and forces applications to declare their intention to capture sound from the inaudible spectrum. This will properly separate the permissions for listening to audible sound and sound in the high-frequency spectrum, and will enable the end users to selectively filter the ultrasound frequencies out of the signal acquired by the smartphone microphone.

More importantly, we argue that the ultrasound ecosystem can be made secure only with the standardization of the ultrasound beacon format. During this process, the threat model will be revised and the necessary security features for uBeacons will be specified. Once this process is completed, APIs for handling uBeacons can be implemented in all major operating systems. Such an API would provide methods for uBeacon discovery, processing, generation and emission, similar to those found in the Bluetooth Low Energy APIs. Thereafter, all ultrasound-enabled apps will need access only to this API, and not to the device’s microphone. Thus, solving the problem of over-privileging that exposed the user’s sensitive data to third-party apps.

Discussion

Our work provides an early warning on the risks looming in the ultrasound ecosystem, and lays the foundations for the secure use of this set of technologies. However, it also raises several questions regarding the security of the audio channel. For instance, in a recent incident a journalist accidentally injected commands to several amazon echo devices, which then allegedly tried to order products online. This underlines the need for security features in the audio channel. Unfortunately, due to the variety of use cases, a universal solution that could be applied to the lower communication layers seems unlikely. Instead, solutions must be sought in the higher communications layers (e.g., application layers), and should be the outcome of careful threat modeling.

Workshop: Theory and Practice of Secure Multiparty Computation

Members of the UCL information security group visiting Aarhus rainbow panorama.
Members of the UCL information security group visiting the Aarhus rainbow panorama

The workshop was organized by CFEM and CTIC, and took place in Aarhus from May 30 until June 3, 2016. The speakers presented both theoretical advancements and practical implementations (e.g., voting, auction systems) of MPC, as well as open problems and future directions.

The first day started with Ivan Damgård presenting TinyTable, a new simple 2-party secure computation protocol. Then Martin Hirt introduced the open problem of general adversary characterization and efficient protocol generation. The last two talks of the day discussed Efficient Constant-Round Multiparty Computation and Privacy-Preserving Outsourcing by Distributed Verifiable Computation.

The first session of the second day included two presentations on theoretical results which introduced a series of three-round secure two-party protocols and their security guarantees, and fast circuit garbling under weak assumptions. On the practical side, Rafael Pass presented formal analysis of the block-chain, and abhi shelat outlined how MPC can enable secure matchings. After the lunch break, probabilistic termination of MPC protocols and low-effort VSS protocols were discussed.

Yuval Ishai and Elette Boyle kicked off the third day by presenting constructions of function secret sharing schemes, and recent developments in the area. After the lunch break, a new hardware design enabling Verifiable ASICs was introduced and the latest progress on “oblivious memories” were discussed.

The fourth day featured presentations on RAMs, Garbled Circuits and a discussion on the computational overhead of MPC under specific adversarial models. Additionally, there was a number of presentations on practical problems, potential solutions and deployed systems. For instance, Aaron Johnson presented a system for private measurements on Tor, and Cybernetica representatives demonstrated Sharemind and their APIs. The rump session of the workshop took place in the evening, where various speakers were given at most 7 minutes to present new problems or their latest research discoveries.

On the final day, Christina Brzuska outlined the connections between different types of obfuscation and one-way functions, and explained why some obfuscators were impossible to construct. Michael Zohner spoke about OT extensions, and how they could be used to improve 2-party computation in conjunction with look-up tables. Claudio Orlandi closed the workshop with his talk on Amortised Garbled Circuits, which explained garbling tricks all the way from Yao’s original work up to the state of the art, and provided a fascinating end to the week.